Lindsey Graham under scrutiny for possible Senate ethics violation, fundraising in federal building

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(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

WASHINGTON, D.C. (WCBD) – Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC) on Wednesday encouraged donations to his fundraising campaign within the halls of Congress — a move some were quick to point out could be a violation of Senate ethics rules.

Following the third day of Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett, Graham spoke to reporters, saying that he thinks South Carolinians are excited about Barrett’s nomination.

When asked by a reporter about the new fundraising numbers posted Wednesday, Graham spoke about the record amount raised by his competitor Jaime Harrison (D), and also records he himself has broken.

However, he also went on to direct viewers to his campaign website, where they can make donations:

“If you want to help me close the gap, lindseygraham.com, a little bit goes a long way.”

According to the Senate Rules and Standards of Conduct for Campaign Activity by the Senate Select Committee on Ethics, campaign activity is prohibited in federal buildings:

§607. Place of solicitation

(a) Prohibition.-

(1) In general – It shall be unlawful for any person to solicit or receive a donation of money or other thing of value in connection with a Federal, State, or local election from a person who is located in a room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties by an officer or employee of the United States. It shall be unlawful for an individual who is an officer or employee of the Federal Government, including the President, Vice President, and Members of Congress, to solicit or receive a donation of money or other thing of value in connection with a Federal, State, or local election, while in any room or building occupied in the discharge of official duties by an officer or employee of the United States, from any person.

(2) Penalty – A person who violates this section shall be fined not more than $5,000, imprisoned not more than 3 years, or both.

While formal actions have yet to be taken, Graham’s opponents are insisting that a tenured member of the Senate should be more aware and respectful of the decorum.

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