North Carolina lieutenant governor doubles down on LGBTQ beliefs, criticism of books

State - Regional

LUCAMA. N.C. (WNCN) – North Carolina Lt. Gov. Mark Robinson defended his criticism of graphic LGBTQ books available in some school libraries in a speech Saturday night at a Republican fundraising event.

In front of about 350 people in Wilson County, Robinson immediately dove into a topic that’s garnered headlines all month, a controversy surrounding comments made over the summer calling transgenderism and homosexuality “filth.”

The comments have led to protests, as well as members of the North Carolina General Assembly to call for Robinson’s resignation.

Robinson later clarified those comments, calling out multiple LGBTQ books, including one with sexually graphic images, as filth.

Robinson said he will not back down as he shared his personal beliefs.

“I believe that homosexuality is a sin. That comes from my deeply held religious convictions. But I also believe adultery is a sin and fornication is a sin. I believe putting pornography in a kid’s school is a sin,” Robinson said. “I am not going to sit silent while you put pornography in schools and present it to children.”

There are some copies of the books in Wake and Durham county school libraries, but both school districts say are not a part of any teaching curriculum.

“I don’t care whether you’re gay, straight. I don’t care whether you’re a Christian or a Muslim. It does not matter to me, your constitutional rights are at my forefront,” Robinson said.

Robinson went on to criticize Gov. Roy Cooper’s mass-gathering restrictions earlier in the COVID-19 pandemic which impacted churches. Robinson also was critical of North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein’s response to last year’s riots and protests.

The annual Wilson County GOP Oyster Roast also hosted Republican candidates running in other elections.

U.S. Congressman Madison Cawthorn (NC-11) also spoke to the crowd, advocating for dismantling the federal department of education.

“I believe that we need to send the ideas and the decisions of what our children are taught here in North Carolina, back to North Carolina and the parents,” Cawthorn said.

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