The Latest: Mexico ‘does not agree’ with new US asylum rule

World
William Barr

FILE – In this April 1, 2019, file photo, Attorney General William Barr attends the 2019 Prison Reform Summit and First Step Act Celebration in the East Room of the White House in Washington. About 2,000 inmates are expected to be released from federal prisons across the U.S. this coming week as part of a sweeping criminal justice overhaul that was signed into law last year. The Justice Department and the federal Bureau of Prisons are working to create risk assessment tools and other measures that would help reduce the federal prison population while easing the transition for inmates back into the community. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Trump administration’s new rule for Central American migrants seeking U.S. asylum (all times local):

2:25 p.m.

Mexican Foreign Relations Secretary Marcelo Ebrard says his country “does not agree with any measure that limits access to asylum. That was a reference to measures announced Monday by the U.S. government to end asylum protections for most migrants who arrive at the U.S.-Mexico border.

Ebrard said at a news conference that a “safe third country” agreement with the United States “is not going to happen,” though he later appeared to hedge on that, saying only it would need prior congressional approval.

He said Mexico would maintain its current asylum practices.

Mexico’s asylum system is also currently overwhelmed by a rise in requests.

The U.S. published a new rule in the Federal Register that says asylum seekers who pass through another country first will be ineligible for asylum at the U.S. southern border. The rule, expected to go into effect Tuesday, also applies to children who have crossed the U.S.-Mexico border alone.

__

10:10 a.m.

Guatemala’s top court has blocked any move by the country’s president to sign a “safe third country” agreement with the United States, a deal that would complicate efforts by other nationalities to seek asylum in the U.S.

A “safe third country” agreement would mean that people from El Salvador, Honduras or other nations generally would have to seek asylum in Guatemala if they cross that country rather than in the United States.

The Constitutional Court granted three injunctions late Sunday to prevent President Jimmy Morales from signing such an agreement. The injunctions had been sought by a group including three former Guatemalan foreign ministers.

Earlier in the day, Guatemala called off a planned Monday meeting in Washington between Morales and President Donald Trump to discuss immigration and security issues.

A new Trump administration rule published Monday would bar Central American migrants from seeking asylum in the U.S. if they’ve traveled through another country first.

___

9:50 a.m.

An American Civil Liberties Union attorney says a new Trump administration rule that bars most Central American migrants from seeking asylum at the U.S.-Mexico border is “patently unlawful.”

Attorney Lee Gelernt says the rule, if it goes into effect, would effectively eliminate asylum for those at the southern border.

Under the Immigration and Nationality Act governing asylum in the U.S., anyone can claim asylum at the border regardless of how he or she arrived. There are some exceptions, including whether an asylum seeker passed through a “safe” country first.

The new rule published Monday states that anyone who has crossed through another country to get to the U.S. is ineligible for asylum. It’s expected to take effect Tuesday. Tens of thousands of migrant families from Central America have been crossing the U.S.-Mexico border each month.

Attorney General William Barr says the new rule uses “a lawful exercise of authority.”

A legal challenge is expected.

___

9:35 a.m.

Attorney General William Barr says a new rule by the Trump administration uses “a lawful exercise of authority” to crack down on asylum claims at the U.S.-Mexico border.

The rule was published Monday and will go into effect Tuesday, blocking migrants from seeking asylum in the United States if they’ve traveled through another country first. Tens of thousands of migrant families from Central America travel through Mexico to the U.S. each month, many claiming asylum.

Barr says the U.S. is being “completely overwhelmed” by migration at the southern border.

Homeland Security acting Secretary Kevin McAleenan says the new rule “will help reduce a major ‘pull’ factor driving irregular migration.”

The rule is almost certain to face a legal challenge.

Immigrant rights groups say the Republican administration’s policies are a cruel effort to keep immigrants out.

___

8:45 a.m.

The Trump administration is moving to end asylum protections for most Central American migrants.

A rule published Monday bars migrants from seeking asylum in the United States if they’ve traveled through another country first.

Tens of thousands of migrant families from Central America travel through Mexico to the U.S. each month, many claiming asylum. The Trump administration claims families are taking advantage of legal loopholes it says allow migrants a free pass to the country while they wait out phony asylum requests.

The rule is almost certain to face a legal challenge.

U.S. law allows refugees to request asylum when they arrive at the U.S. regardless of how they did so. But there’s an exception for those who have come through a country considered “safe.”

Immigrant rights groups say the Republican administration’s policies are a cruel effort to keep immigrants out.

Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Trending Stories

More trending stories

Dowloand Our News Apps

FREE News & Weather Apps

Get the StormTracker13 Weather App

Download Now:

Get the News13 News App

Download Now: